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Accra Should Learn from Kampala: Ban Giving Money to Child Beggars.

Accra Should Learn from Kampala: Ban Giving Money to Child Beggars. published on

It’s Time We Learn Lessons from Kampala And Ban Giving of Alms To Child Beggars On The Streets of Accra. 

It’s very heart-warming to hear reports that the local authorities in Kampala, the capital city of Uganda last May 2019 passed a bye law banning giving of alms to children begging on the streets, as too many African children are being exploited economically through the begging business.

So my question is what is Accra waiting for? When will authorities in Accra – Ghana confront the menace of the proliferating economic exploitation of children on major streets of Accra?

According to Kampala’s new law, anyone caught giving money or food to a child beggar will face up to six months prison term or a fine of eleven dollars $11.

It’s our hope that the punishment will be deterrent enough to stop the practice of forcing young children, especially girls on to the streets to beg for adults under the scorching sun.

The authorities believe the law will curtail the commercial exploitation of children in the capital because too many children are forced to live on the streets of Kampala instead of living at home and going to school.

In Accra, this same problem is becoming wide spread. Child beggars have taken over most of the major streets and traffic lights in the capital.

As at now no one seems to be addressing the issue even though the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Children’s Act 1998 Act 560 prohibit economic exploitation of children.

That is why we are calling on the government of Ghana, and local authorities of Accra to follow the example of Kampala in banning the practice.

We believe that once people stop giving out money to these children, the commercialization of children on the street will no longer be a viable business venture for unscrupulous individuals and parents.

 In effect, the practice of trafficking children into the lucrative business of begging will hopefully stop or reduce drastically.

Written By

Rose Mary Kayi

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